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    Adam McCrimmon, Ph.D., R.Psych.

    Director, Autism Spectrum Education, Research, and Training (ASERT)
    School Psychology, Faculty of Education
    University of Calgary

    Bio

    Adam completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Calgary and his M.A. in Clinical-Developmental Psychology at York University. He then went back home to Calgary to complete his doctorate in School and Applied Child Psychology. A Registered Psychologist in Alberta since 2010, Adam has focused his research and clinical work on Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). He currently directs the Autism Spectrum Education, Research, and Training (ASERT) lab at the University of Calgary where he oversees research on ASD and trains students in assessment of and intervention for individuals with ASD. He regularly reviews applications for registration for the College of Alberta Psychologists. He was elected as a Member-at-Large of the Educational and School Psychology section of CPA in 2013 and serves as an Associate Editor of the Canadian Journal of School Psychology. He is the father of two young boys and enjoys spending time with them and his family.

    Goals

    One of my main goals is to connect academics and clinicians in Educational/School Psychology so that information is more readily shared among and accessed by these professionals. By encouraging greater involvement and participation by practicing school psychologists and connecting them with academics, the needs of each can be appreciated and supported. I have worked with school-based professionals over the past several years to desired supports for students with ASD in an effort to more effectively address the identified needs. One component of this work has been integration of school-based needs into my program of research and training students under my research and/or clinical supervision to engage research findings with the school-based professionals in their clinical settings. In alignment with this, a second goal is greater involvement of school-based psychologists in the section. A final goal is to enhance the reputation of the discipline of school psychology. We have experienced difficulties with others appreciating the usefulness and importance of our work and clinical skillset for the past several years, and many school psychologists find that they are underutilized. I hope to work with CPA and the Educational and School Psychology Section around this issue.

    Debra Lean

    Bio

    Dr. Debra Lean is a School and Clinical Psychologist with 30 years of experience in school boards and hospital mental health departments, as well as private practice. She received her Master’s and Doctorate in Clinical Psychology from Concordia University in Montreal. Dr. Lean has been registered with the College of Psychologists of Ontario since 1988, and serves periodically as an examiner for the College’s oral exams. She is currently in her 15th year as the Chief Psychologist of the Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board, in the Greater Toronto Area. Dr. Lean provided school psychology services for the Board for 13 years previous to her appointment as Chief. She has been the Chair of the Ontario Psychological Association’s Section on Psychology in Education since 2011 and is a member of the Editorial Board of the Canadian Journal of School Psychology. Dr. Lean is the co-author of two books on integrating school-based mental health services, Barriers to Learning: The Case for Integrated Mental Health Services in Schools (2010) and School-based Mental Health: A Framework for Intervention (2013). Her recent research activities include school-based mental health service models, a play-based mental health prevention program for primary age children with school adjustment difficulties, cognitive behaviour intervention for anxious students, and alternative school psychology delivery models.

    Goals

    Dr. Lean is most interested in continuing her role as a member-at-large in the Section. She is passionate about supporting and broadening the role of school psychologists in Ontario and across the country, and appreciates the opportunity to work with the Section on various school and educational psychology projects. Within her own Psychology Department, Dr. Lean developed innovative Board-wide teams, including Autism consultation and diagnoses, a consulting neuropsychology service and a mental health diagnostic and intervention service. Dr. Lean is currently coordinating a group of Chief Psychologists in Ontario school boards who will submit a request for an update of the school psychology area of practice definition to the College of Psychologists of Ontario. She is also an invited member of a cross-sectoral working committee on Learning Disability diagnosis, as well as a member of a Reference Group to the Ministry of Education on intervention for reading disabilities

    Jennifer Theule

    Bio

    Jennifer (Jen) Theule is an Assistant Professor in both the School and Clinical Psychology programs at the University of Manitoba. Her research focuses on children and families, studying attention-deficit/hyperactivity, parent-child attachment, and interventions for young children, with a special interest in parenting and developmental psychopathology. Her academic work largely involves meta-analyses as a form of investigation. She is also the Director of the Family and Developmental Psychopathology lab at the University of Manitoba, where she and her students investigate the relationship between a variety of parental factors, such as mental health, and child outcomes. She graduated from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto (OISE/UT) in 2010 after completing an internship at ROCK: Reach Out Centre for Kids, in Burlington, Ontario. Clinically, Jen focuses on providing parenting support, consultation to schools, and comprehensive (often cross-battery) psychoeducational assessments of preschool through adolescent-aged youth.

    Goals

    My goals for the school psychology section are to facilitate connections between school psychology training programs to provide further support for the profession in each province. I would also like to support links to other related fields, which may also increase visibility and esteem for the field of school psychology. This year I have also been working with Dr. Troy Janzen to coordinate the Educational and School Psychology Section student poster awards, and I would like to expand that program to further include Gimme-5 presentations. Overall though, my primary goal is to support the field of school psychology, and represent the views of the varied members of the section.